• ADAM AND EVE AS PRIESTS.

     

    ADAM AND EVE AS PRIESTS.

     

    “In early interpretation, the book of Jubilee presents Adam as offering incense when he leaves Eden, thereby supporting both the priestly role of Adam and the identification of Eden as sacred space. [...]

     

    In the account of his origins Adam served as an archetype with all humanity represented in him. In his priestly role he serves as a representational agent serving on behalf of humanity; all humans are represented by him.

     

    Adam’s role must then be understood in light of the role of the priest in the ancient world. When we read the Bible, we often think of priests as ritual experts and as those instructing the people in the ways of the Lord and the law. That is true, but those tasks fit into a larger picture. The main task of the priest was the preservation of sacred space.

    [...] Because of the nature of the task of serving in sacred space, the only appropriate ally would be one that is Adam’s ontological equal. [...] God then shows Adam in a vision that woman is his ontological equal, and when he awakes she is brought to him and he recognizes that fact: bone of my bone and flesh of my flesh.” (John H. Walton, The Lost World of Adam and Eve: Genesis 2—3 and the Human Origins Debate (InterVarsity Press: Downers Grove, IL), 2015, p. 108-110).

    “Through the account in Genesis 2, it shown that woman was not just another creature but was like the man, in fact, his other half sharing his nature, and was therefore suitable as his ally. She joined him as guardian and mediator with the task of preserving, protecting and expanding sacred space. It was not unusual in the ancient world for women to serve in priestly roles [...]

     

    [...] The role of Adam and Eve in the garden, I would propose, has less to do with how the priests operated within Israel and more to do with Israel’s role (and later, that of believers, 1 Pet 2:9) as priests to the world.” (John H. Walton, The Lost World of Adam and Eve: Genesis 2—3 and the Human Origins Debate (InterVarsity Press: Downers Grove, IL), 2015, p. 111-113)… Har Tsiyyon (Facebook).

     


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